News

March 14, 2014

Hawk Mountain welcomes Carl Roe as new Sanctuary board member

The Hawk Mountain Sanctuary board of directors has elected Carl Roe, the newly retired Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Game Commission, to a four-year term on the Sanctuary board. 

Roe is a 2013 Hawk Mountain Warden Award recipient for having demonstrated outstanding support of the Sanctuary and its conservation mission, in particular for helping to secure from the Game Commission a $250,000 jump-start gift to support building a new Outdoor Amphitheater, a $10,000 grant to fund telemetry research on vultures in Bradford County, and a multi-year grant to support a 2014 telemetry study of broad-winged hawks and vulture movements in the Commonwealth. 

“Managing and protecting our wildlife resources enhances the quality of life,” Roe says.

Roe served as the Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Game Commission from 2005 to 2013 and was the agency’s first-ever long-range strategic planner since 2001. Under his leadership, the commission added more than 50,000 acres of state game lands and implemented the Mentored Youth Hunting Program. Prior to his role as executive director, he served as the director of the Commission’s Bureau of Administrative Services, where he spearheaded the effort to implement an electronic license sale system. 

Roe has earned three master’s degrees in public administration, management, and Latin American Studies, and a bachelor's degree in political science. He also boasts a decorated 30-year military career, and has served on the boards of the American Red Cross El Paso Area Chapter, the Rio Grande Council of Governments, and the Economic Development Committee of the El Paso Chamber of Commerce. He is a long-time member of Ducks Unlimited, the National Wild Turkey Federation, the National Rifle Association, and Woodcock Limited, and currently resides in Carlisle, PA, with his wife and two daughters.

Celebrating 80 years in raptor conservation, Hawk Mountain Sanctuary is the world's first refuge for birds of prey and an international center for raptor conservation. The 2,500-acre Sanctuary, 8-mile trail system and Visitor Center is open to the public year-round. A trail fee or membership dues supports local to global conservation programs, including public education, professional training and scientific research programs. Visit www.hawkmountain.org to learn more. 

#    #    #

Alvin H. Butz, Inc