Recent Sightings

Sightings From November 2012

November 27, 2012

Immature Bald Eagle

Immature Bald Eagle

This bird, seen on Saturday, November 24, was one of six eagles that day. You can identify the juvenile bald eagle by the frosty streaking on the undersides. It takes four to five years until the young eagle develops the snowy head and all-over dark body, but there's no mistaking that enormous size. Photo by Bill Moses.

November 24, 2012

Juvenile Bald Eagle

Juvenile Bald Eagle

Another great view of the juenile bald eagle in flight. Photo by Bill Moses.

November 17, 2012

White-wing Crossbill at North Lookout

White-wing Crossbill at North Lookout

Teenager Zach Moyer was on hand to catch this White-wing Crossbill that perched at the North Lookout.

November 14, 2012

Ovenbird at the Feeder Windows

Ovenbird at the Feeder Windows

Brian Moroney visited today, donning his volunteer cap to conduct the feeder count andcaught a few great photos of an ovenbird.

No, ovenbirds shouldn't be seen at the feeders during November, but this individual doesn't think so! It hopped about the ground below the bird feeders all day long. Another visitor reported having seen one on Sunday---now we have proof that she was right.

Ovenbirds get their name from the oven-like nest that they build on the forest floor.

November 11, 2012

Black Vultures at North Lookout

Black Vultures at North Lookout

Jake Stoltzfus shared this great photo of two black vultures perched at the North Lookout on November 11. November is the peak migration for this species, which is less numerous in the east than the more commonly known turkey vulture.

November 5, 2012

Common Redpoll

Common Redpoll

First documented common redpoll at Hawk Mountain for autumn 2012! This irruptive migrant was spotted by Lookout regular and volunteer Lee Simpson and photographed by a former intern Jennifer Ottinger.

Redpolls nest in the northern tundra and boreal forest regions of North America, and only during an irruption will they migrate south in big numbers. We haven't seen a big irruption here at Hawk Mountain since the late 1990s although in 2008 we did see a few small flocks. 
 
Redpolls feed on birch catkins and other natural sources and will eat niger seed. Let us know if you see any at your feeders!

November 3, 2012

black vultures by brian repa on nov 3 2012 at east rocks

black vultures by brian repa on nov 3 2012 at east rocks

A great photo by Brian Repa of three black vultures hanging out at East Rocks.

November 3, 2012

Leucistic Redtail

Leucistic Redtail

Bill Moses snapped several photos of one of the two leucistic redtails that passed on Saturday, November 3.

Several people asked "why a redtail?" You can't see it in this image, but one of Bill's photos did show some red on the tail, and in redtails, the wings bulge out in the secondaries, as you see in this bird.

Leucistic or "leucism" is a condition characterized by reduced pigmentation in animals. Unlike albinism, it is caused by a reduction in all types of skin pigment, not just melanin. Essentially it is a defect in pigment cells that results in either all white or patches of white.

November 3, 2012

Golden Crowned Kinglet

Golden Crowned Kinglet

Golden-crowned Kinglet photographed on the River of Rocks Trail just below the Escarpment Trail. Great shot, Brian Repa! Seen November 3, 2012

November 3, 2012

Redtail over ridge by Brian Repa on Nov 3 2012

Redtail over ridge by Brian Repa on Nov 3 2012

Great image of a redtail soaring over the ridge. Brian Repa took the photo from the Skyline Trail as the bird sailed over the River of Rocks boulder field. Cool!

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