Recent Sightings

Sightings From February 2014

February 28, 2014

Skunk

Skunk

Our friend the skunk came back for a visit and decided to make himself at home in our office area! Although skunks undergo a torpid state in the cold days of winter, they will occasionally emerge from their dens on warmer winter days to search for food. They also make use of a variety of structures (sometimes underneath buildings) to call home, so it's likely this one was looking for a warm place to stay. Fortunately, with the help of expert Trapper Marty from Wildlife Pest Control, the skunk was safely relocated to our great outdoors.  Photo by Trapper Marty

February 26, 2014

Skunk

Skunk

Some say its a sure sign of spring, and we sure hope so. A skunk made an early-afternoon visit to the bird-feeders, and seemed to really enjoy the heated bird-bath that was recently installed. The device is heated just enough to keep water from freezing, and is used by mammals and birds alike. Photo by Jennifer Cleary.

February 20, 2014

White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

A White-breasted Nuthatch looks to a bird feeder, hoping to grab a bite of seed. A common question about Nuthatches is: Why do they hang upside-down? Typically they are a shy feeder bird and it is thought that positioning themselves this way gives them an advantage of a quick get-away, but it is actually more for finding insects in trees. Unlike woodpeckers, who find food by walking up trees, nuthatches search for insects by walking down trees, thus allowing them to find bugs that other birds can't see. Extra long toes and sharp toenails give it this amazing clinging ability, and you can attract them to your bird feeder by offering large nuts such as sunflowers or peanuts!

February 18, 2014

Northern ringneck snake

Northern ringneck snake

This northern ringneck snake is a frequent visitor of Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, especially in the cold days of winter. These small, non venomous snakes tend to hibernate under rocks and in mammal burrows, stone walls, house cellars, and rotting logs and stumps, but this one can occasionally be seen resting in Hawk Mountain's Visitor Center! Photo by Mary Linkevich.

February 18, 2014

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal

This male Northern Cardinal posed for a picture in the early morning, his bright red feathers brilliant against the snowy wooded backdrop. A territorial song bird, cardinal males are known to mistake their own reflections as other males and may fight reflective surfaces, as this one occasionally has against the Sanctuary's Conference Room window. 

February 12, 2014

Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

This Tufted Titmouse was seen over the bird feeders early this morning, preening his feathers and occasionally whistling out his song. A species in the tit and chickadee family, these birds are commonly seen foraging on branches for insects, but are more shy at bird feeders and prefer to eat the seed from the cover of nearby trees or bushes. Photo by Jennifer Cleary.

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